Arqueología Militar

Ver el tema anterior Ver el tema siguiente Ir abajo

Arqueología Militar

Mensaje por Montero el Sáb Ene 11, 2014 12:54 am

Publicado por el forista Esteban McLaren el 25/02/2006 en [Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver este vínculo]

Encuentran un T-34 con marcas alemanas en Estonia

Las últimas noticias acerca del tanque T-34.

Se ha logrado encender con éxito el motor diesel sin utilizar ninguna pieza de repuesto. Se han sustituido los rodamientos sólo por rollos de patinaje.
El ensamble del tanque pronto llegará a su final y estará listo para corridas de prueba.
Está previsto en la temporada siguiente para llevar a turistas y ser exhibido como una exposición de trabajo de nuestro museo.

La información detallada sobre el T-34.

Los alemanes han empujado  scratch  este tanque al lago, cuando el combustible se terminó a finales de 1944, a una profundidad de 12 metros. Por encima de él había seis metros de turba y sedimentos. Durante dos semanas, los buceadores del club sacaron sedimentos arrastrados de encima del tanque. Cualquier rastro de aceite sobre el agua se ha ido. Se ha encontrado el tanque de Igor Sedunov en las memorias de los residentes locales. El combustible en los tanques esta ausente, y no había aceite en el motor.

Para ver un mapa de un lugar donde se encuentra el tanque.

To look a map of a place where have found the tank.


[Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver esa imagen]

[Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver esa imagen]

[Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver esa imagen]

[Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver esa imagen]

[Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver esa imagen]

[Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver esa imagen]

[Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver esa imagen]

[Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver esa imagen]

[Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver esa imagen]

Fuente

_________________
DEVUELVAN LAS MALVINAS!!
avatar
Montero
Administrador
Administrador

Mensajes : 1796
Fecha de inscripción : 01/12/2013
Edad : 60
Localización : Ciudad de Buenos Aires

http://fdra.foroargentina.net

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Arqueología Militar

Mensaje por Montero el Sáb Ene 11, 2014 12:58 am

Publicado por el forista Esteban McLaren el 10/03/2011 en [Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver este vínculo]

Ancient 'cold case' traced to chemical warfare

[Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver esa imagen]
Yale University Art Gallery, Dura-Europos Collection
The skeleton of a Persian soldier found in the siege tunnels of Dura. The man may have choked on toxic fumes from a fire he himself started. The man's armor is pulled up around his chest; archaeologists suspect he was trying to pull it off as he died.

Almost 2,000 years ago, 19 Roman soldiers rushed into a cramped underground tunnel, prepared to defend the Roman-held Syrian city of Dura-Europos from an army of Persians digging to undermine the city's mudbrick walls.

But instead of Persian soldiers, the Romans met with a wall of noxious black smoke that turned to acid in their lungs. Their crystal-pommeled swords were no match for this weapon; the Romans choked and died in moments, many with their last pay of coins still slung in purses on their belts.

Nearby, a Persian soldier perhaps the one who started the toxic underground fire suffered his own death throes, grasping desperately at his chain mail shirt as he choked.

These 20 men, who died in A.D. 256, may be the first victims of chemical warfare to leave any archaeological evidence of their passing, according to a new investigation. The case is a cold one, with little physical evidence left behind beyond drawings and archaeological excavation notes from the 1930s. But a new analysis of those materials published in January in the American Journal of Archaeology finds that the soldiers likely did not die by the sword as the original excavator believed. Instead, they were gassed.

Where there's smoke
In the 250s, the Persian Sasanian Empire set its sights on taking the Syrian city of Dura from Rome. The city, which backs up against the Euphrates River, was by this time a Roman military base, well-fortified with meters-thick walls.

The Persians set about tunneling underneath those walls in an effort to bring them down so troops could rush into the city. They likely started their excavations 130 feet away from the city, in a tomb in Dura's underground necropolis. Meanwhile, the Roman defenders dug their own countermines in hopes of intercepting the tunneling Persians.

The outlines of this underground cat-and-mouse game was first sketched out by French archaeologist Robert du Mesnil du Buisson, who first excavated these siege tunnels in the 1920s and 30s. Du Mesnil also found the piled bodies of at least 19 Roman soldiers and one lone Persian in the tunnels beneath the city walls. He envisioned fierce hand-to-hand combat underground, during which the Persians drove back the Romans and then set fire to the Roman tunnel. Crystals of sulfur and bitumen, a naturally occurring, tarlike petrochemical, were found in the tunnel, suggesting that the Persians made the fire fast and hot.

Something about that scenario didn't make sense to Simon James, an archaeologist and historian from the University of Leicester in England. For one thing, it would have been difficult to engage in hand-to-hand combat in the tunnels, which could barely accommodate a man standing upright. For another, the position of the bodies on du Mesnil's sketches didn't match a scenario in which the Romans were run through or burned to death.

"This wasn't a pile of people who had been crowded into a small space and collapsed where they stood," James told LiveScience. "This was a deliberate pile of bodies."

Using old reports and sketches, James reconstructed the events in the tunnel on that deadly day. At first, he said, he thought the Romans had trampled each other while trying to escape the tunnel. But when he suggested that idea to his colleagues, one suggested an alternative: What about smoke?

Fumes of hell
Chemical warfare was well established by the time the Persians besieged Dura, said Adrienne Mayor, a historian at Stanford University and author of "Greek Fire, Poison Arrows & Scorpion Bombs: Biological and Chemical Warfare in the Ancient World" (Overlook Press, 2003).

"There was a lot of chemical warfare (in the ancient world)," Mayor, who was not involved in the study, told LiveScience. "Few people are aware of how much there is documented in the ancient historians about this."

One of the earliest examples, Mayor said, was a battle in 189 B.C., when Greeks burned chicken feathers and used bellows to blow the smoke into Roman invaders' siege tunnels. Petrochemical fires were a common tool in the Middle East, where flammable naphtha and oily bitumen were easy to find. Ancient militaries were endlessly creative: When Alexander the Great attacked the Phoenician city of Tyre in the fourth century B.C., Phoenician defenders had a surprise waiting for him.

"They heated fine grains of sand in shields, heated it until it was red-hot, and then catapulted it down onto Alexander's army," Mayor said. "These tiny pieces of red-hot sand went right under their armor and a couple inches into their skin, burning them."

So the idea that the Persians had learned how to make toxic smoke is, "totally plausible," Mayor said.

"I think (James) really figured out what happened," she said.

In the new interpretation of the clash in the tunnels of Dura, the Romans heard the Persians working beneath the ground and steered their tunnel to intercept their enemies. The Roman tunnel was shallower than the Persian one, so the Romans planned to break in on the Persians from above. But there was no element of surprise for either side: The Persians could also hear the Romans coming.

So the Persians set a trap. Just as the Romans broke through, James said, they lit a fire in their own tunnel. Perhaps they had a bellows to direct the smoke, or perhaps they relied on the natural chimney effect of the shaft between the two tunnels. Either way, they threw sulfur and bitumen on the flames. One of the Persian soldiers was overcome and died, a victim of his own side's weapon. The Romans met with the choking gas, which turned to sulfuric acid in their lungs.

"It would have almost been literally the fumes of hell coming out of the Roman tunnel," James said.

Any Roman soldiers waiting to enter the tunnels would have hesitated, seeing the smoke and hearing their fellow soldiers dying, James said. Meanwhile, the Persians waited for the tunnel to clear, and then hurried to collapse the Roman tunnel. They dragged the bodies into the stacked position in which du Mesnil would later find them. With no time to ransack the corpses, they left coins, armor and weapons untouched.

Horrors of war
After du Mesnil finished excavations, he had the tunnels filled in. Presumably, the skeletons of the soldiers remain where he found them. That makes proving the chemical warfare theory difficult, if not impossible, James said.

"It's a circumstantial case," he said. "But what it does do is it doesn't invent anything. We've got the actual stuff (the sulfur and bitumen) on the ground. It's an established technique."

If the Persians were using chemical warfare at this time, it shows that their military operations were extremely sophisticated, James said.

"They were as smart and clever as the Romans and were doing the same things they were," he said.

The story also brings home the reality of ancient warfare, James said.

"It's easy to regard this very clinically and look at this as artifacts. Here at Dura you really have got this incredibly vivid evidence of the horrors of ancient warfare," he said. "It was horrendously dangerous, brutal and one hardly has words for it, really."


Fuente

_________________
DEVUELVAN LAS MALVINAS!!
avatar
Montero
Administrador
Administrador

Mensajes : 1796
Fecha de inscripción : 01/12/2013
Edad : 60
Localización : Ciudad de Buenos Aires

http://fdra.foroargentina.net

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Arqueología Militar

Mensaje por Montero el Sáb Ene 11, 2014 1:03 am

Publicado por el forista Esteban McLaren el 20/10/2011 en [Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver este vínculo]

Descubren un barco vikingo intacto, con su guerrero adentro
Un equipo de arqueólogos británicos halló una las nave funeraria nórdicas de hace 1000 años; además del cuerpo había una espada, una lanza y piezas cerámicas


[Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver esa imagen]
La espada del guerrero vikingo, muy bien conservada. Foto: AP
LONDRES.- Un equipo de arqueólogos británicos descubrió uno de los barcos funerarios nórdicos más importantes hallados en suelo británico, que contenía los restos de un guerrero de alto rango con su hacha, espada y lanza, en una península remota de Escocia.

La nave vikinga, que estaba intacta, incluía además lo que podría ser la punta de un cuerno de bronce para beber, además de otros objetos como una piedra de afilar herramientas provenientes de Noruega, un cuchillo y piezas de cerámica vikinga.

La embarcación de más de 1000 años de antigüedad, fue desenterrada en las montañas escocesas al noroeste del Highlands, en un sitio llamado Ardnamurchan. Ya en el pasado, se habían realizado hallazgos similares en la isla escocesa de Orkney.

La arqueóloga Hannah Cobb, que encabezó el equipo de expertos, declaró que los artefactos y su preservación "hacen que el lugar sea uno de los más importantes sitios funerarios noruegos jamás excavados en Gran Bretaña".

Los vikingos de Escandinavia hacían incursiones frecuentes en Escocia y lo que hoy es el noreste de Inglaterra durante los siglos VIII y IX, y hubo algunos asentamientos vikingos en la zona.

[Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver esa imagen]
La espada, bajo la mirada de rayos X. Foto: AFP
"Un entierro vikingo con bote ya es un descubrimiento increíble, pero los artefactos y la preservación de éste lo hacen una de las excavaciones de tumbas nórdicas más importantes en Gran Bretaña", dijo Cobb, codirectora del proyecto.

La experta de la Universidad de Manchester que co-dirigió el proyecto arqueológico desde hacía seis años, calificó el descubrimiento "de mucho interés". Las excavaciones contaron además con la ayuda de arqueólogos de las Universidades de Leicester, Newcastle y Glasgow.

Agencias AFP y ANSA.

La Nación

_________________
DEVUELVAN LAS MALVINAS!!
avatar
Montero
Administrador
Administrador

Mensajes : 1796
Fecha de inscripción : 01/12/2013
Edad : 60
Localización : Ciudad de Buenos Aires

http://fdra.foroargentina.net

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Arqueología Militar

Mensaje por Montero el Sáb Ene 11, 2014 1:07 am

Publicado por el forista Esteban McLaren el 03/11/2011 en [Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver este vínculo]

Submarino holandes de la Segunda Guerra Mundial encontrado luego de 70 años
[[url]Maquina de Combate[/url] <> 02112011-06] Un submarino de la Real Armada Holandesa, el HNLMS K XVI, que se hundio en 1941 con toda su tripulacion de 36 marinos, incluyendo a 6 de nacionalidad indonesa, fue encontrado. Tras el aviso de un pescador local que habia avistado los restos, en octubre del 2011, un equipo conjunto de buceadores amateur de Australia y Singapur encontraron el submarino en aguas al norte de la isla de Borneo.
Expertos marinos estudiaron las fotografias tomadas por os buceadores y observaron las inconfundibles caracteristicas – de acuerdo al ministerio de defendsa de los Paises Bajos – de un submarino holandes. Este pedazo de informacion, en combinacion con otros registros permitio la identificacion del bote hundido como el K XVI. Esto lleva a su fin un muy largo periodo de duda de los familiares de los miembros de la tripulacion. El comandante de la Real Armada Holandesa, vice-almirante Matthieu Borsboom, le transmitio las noticias a los familiares conocidos.
El submarino HNLMS K XVI era parte de una flota aliada, encargada de detener la invasion japonesa a las Indias del Este, entonces colonia holandesa El submarino de 1.000 toneladas de desplazamiento hundio el submarino de ataque japones Sagiri en la noche buena de 1941, unicamente para ser hundido, al dia siguiente, por otro submarino japones, el I-66 en el Mar de China del Sur.
Con el descubrimiento del HNLMS K XVI, el unico otro submarino holandes aun sin localizar es el HNLMS O 13. Este submarino se hundio en el Mar del Norte. Los restos del HNLMS K XVI seran designados como tumba de guerra.
[Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver esa imagen]

_________________
DEVUELVAN LAS MALVINAS!!
avatar
Montero
Administrador
Administrador

Mensajes : 1796
Fecha de inscripción : 01/12/2013
Edad : 60
Localización : Ciudad de Buenos Aires

http://fdra.foroargentina.net

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Arqueología Militar

Mensaje por Contenido patrocinado


Contenido patrocinado


Volver arriba Ir abajo

Ver el tema anterior Ver el tema siguiente Volver arriba

- Temas similares

 
Permisos de este foro:
No puedes responder a temas en este foro.