Fuerza Aérea de Canadá

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Fuerza Aérea de Canadá

Mensaje por Montero el Dom Abr 06, 2014 6:19 pm

Publicado por el forista SiberianSky el 17/12/2007 en [Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver este vínculo]

Reestructuración en la Fuerza Aérea Canadiense.

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Una de las fuerzas aéreas que sufrieron más de los recortes presupuestarios de la post-guerra fría fueron las fuerzas canadienses. Esta fuerza aérea está experimentando otra vez una reestructuración importante que está incluyendo una reducción de aviones a todo el total del parque de cerca de 285 aviones y helicópteros.

Como un resultado directo de la guerra fría todo el poderío canadiense de combate fue replegado de Europa. Esto incluyó los CF-18 Hornet del 409sq, del 421sq y del 439sq así como una pequeña cantidad de CT-133s basado en Baden Söllingen. También fueron replegados una pequeña cantidad de CH-136 Kiowas del 444sq basado en Lahr. Ambas bases fueron cerradas para operaciones militares en 1993 y 1994 respectivamente.

Vuelta al hogar en Canadá todo el poderío aéreo de las fuerzas canadienses fue organizado bajo el comando de aire que era el sucesor directo de la Real Fuerza Aérea Canadiense que dejó de existir como un servicio separado en 1968. Las unidades de aviones de caza fueron destinadas al grupo de avión de cazas que incluyó el CG canadiense de la región de NORAD en el tramo del norte del CFB; las unidades que apoyaban a patrulla marítima y las actividades del ASW fueron destinadas al grupo aéreo marítimo, estableciendo jefatura en CFB Halifax; el poderío de transporte aéreo/táctico al grupo del transporte aéreo en CFB Trenton; las unidades de helicópteros del ejército a 10 grupos del aire tácticos en CFB Montreal y las actividades de reservistas para el grupo aéreo de la reserva en CFB Winnipeg.

Otra reestructuración importante en 1997 consideró el licenciamiento de los cinco grupos mencionados anteriormente y el establecimiento de 1 división aérea canadiense (1 CAD). La fuerza aérea canadiense consiste en hoy un total de doce alas con las unidades del vuelo destinadas a ellas. Las operaciones del Hornet, actualmente el único tipo de combate funcionando, se concentran debajo el Ala 3 en CFB Bagotville y el Ala 4 en el CFB Coldlake. Operaciones rotatorias de ASW bajo del Ala 12 en la CFB Shearwater. Operaciones de Aurora bajo el Ala 14 en CFB Greenwood con un escuadrón adicional en el Ala 19 de CFB Comox, el poderío de transporte principal bajo del Ala 8 en CFB Trenton con unidades adicionales con el Ala 14 y el Ala 17.

Las unidades de apoyo del ejército que operan el CH-146 Griffon están asignadas al Ala 1 en CFB Kingston. El entrenamiento del vuelo es emprendido por la unidad Bombardier funcionando el Entrenamiento de Vuelo de la OTAN en Canadá (NFTC) en 15 alas.



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Re: Fuerza Aérea de Canadá

Mensaje por Montero el Dom Abr 06, 2014 6:24 pm

Publicado por el forista Wuriburu el 05/06/2009 en [Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver este vínculo]

Allies quietly urging Canada to deploy CF-18s to Afghanistan.

20/04/2009

The United States and NATO have “expressed a desire” for Canada to deploy CF-18 Hornet fighter jets to Afghanistan, according to the Canadian general who leads the coalition’s air war in Afghanistan. “I can tell you from the senior Canadian in this headquarters that I have been asked on several occasions by AFCENT (United States Air Forces Central) and CENTCOM (Central Command), ‘How can we get Canadian F-18s into the game over here?’” said Maj.-Gen. Duff Sullivan. “And I’ve told them that that is a political decision back in Canada.” Sullivan, 52, flew sorties in CF-18s over the Balkans and during the first U.S.-led war against Iraq in 1991.

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“What has been highlighted to me as the director of the air element here, the commander of AFCENT has said that it would relieve the pressure on his American squadrons if we could have Canadian F-18s come in. I haven’t commented one way or the other, but passed it back to Canada to the chief of defence and I know that issue is well known in his office.” But Sunday evening Defence Minister Peter MacKay’s director of communications, Dan Dugas, disputed the notion it was a ‘political decision.’ “The general is somehow mistaken on this issue,” he said. “This is something that has not gone through a chain of command and then to the minister’s office . . . so it can hardly be a political decision if it hasn’t made its way through the chain of command.”

“If the chain of command believes this is worthwhile they would make a recommendation to the minister, as far as I know this has not happened.” Sullivan has been described by U.S. Gen. David McKiernan, the top NATO commander in Afghanistan, as his “air czar.” The Cornwall, Ont., native is a graduate of the U.S. air force’s most prestigious combat school and flew NATO missions in Germany for Canada for seven years. “Whenever our troops are in trouble and taking casualties, every single time they call for air support — armed overwatch — that is what the Canadian F-18s would do,” Sullivan said, noting that Canada alone among the allies contributes combat ground forces in Afghanistan without also providing close air support.

"This is what I think that other allies are noticing and pointing out to me,” Sullivan said. “Canada is the only nation that has not yet done a tour of duty with its fighter force . . . If we brought our F-18s it would allow us to be fully involved in the air/land operation.” The questions being asked about Canada’s CF-18s was “interesting in the NATO environment because before officially asking a country to fill a capability they will unofficially ask them to feel them out about where they are,” said Sullivan, who is also deputy director of air/land operations for NATO’s International Security Assistance Force.

Lt.-Gen. Michel Gauthier, who commands all Canadian troops overseas, said during a visit to Kandahar last month that the air force was already making a major contribution in Afghanistan and that Canada had no plans to deploy CF-18s to Kandahar. “You have to recognize that Canada is contributing in a very, very significant manner with the more than 3,000 troops we have on the ground,” Sullivan said, echoing some of Gauthier’s comments. “We have (also) plussed up with our Chinooks and Griffons (helicopters) and Herons (unmanned surveillance drones), so there is no doubt Canada is shouldering quite an impressive contribution.” The helicopters and the drones with Canadian markings began flying missions at Kandahar Airfield early this year. They joined a small number of Canadian CC-130 Hercules transports that have been flying cargo and soldiers within theatre for NATO for several years. Canada’s four relatively new C-17 cargo planes also provide crucial logistical support to Task Force Afghanistan.

Still, “the fighter capability is perhaps an area that Canada might wish to think about bringing into theatre in the future, as well,” Sullivan said. Accommodation is at a premium at Kandahar because of a major buildup of U.S. forces this spring. However, the general said that space could be found if Ottawa decided to send CF-18s to Afghanistan. Canada’s fighter fleet is about to complete a modernization program. The upgrades include a sophisticated new targeting pod that can provide an instant data link to commanders in the field and the ability to carry new precision-guided munitions. “Everything is now coagulating and coming together in respect to the F-18. It will be full up and ready to go in the August-September time frame,” Sullivan said. “If deployed, they would be stars over here.”
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Re: Fuerza Aérea de Canadá

Mensaje por Montero el Dom Abr 06, 2014 6:26 pm

Publicado por el forista Esteban McLaren el 08/06/2010 en [Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver este vínculo]

Ottawa set to spend $9 billion on 65 U.S. fighter jets.
by Daniel Leblanc

Ottawa, from Tuesday's Globe and Mail, Jun. 07, 2010

Ottawa is moving on a sole-sourced purchase of high-tech U.S. fighter jets to replace its CF-18s despite furious last-minute lobbying by rival manufacturers.

Industry and government sources said the cabinet is expected in coming days to approve the launch of negotiations on price and delivery schedules with Lockheed-Martin, the U.S.-based manufacturer of the Joint Strike Fighter F-35.

The government is moving early on buying 65 new aircraft in a bid to lock up the price long before the jets start entering into service in 2017, sources said.

The contract worth up to $9 billion would be awarded without competition, with the Harper government set to argue the only other aircraft that could eventually meet the needs of the Canadian Forces would be built in China or Russia, and that such a purchase wouldnt fly in Canada.

But that hasnt stopped the manufacturers of jets such as Boeings Super Hornet from trying to whip up a storm in Parliament and the defence community.

Lobbyists have been contacting journalists and parliamentarians in an attempt to put out the story that Canada could get new aircraft at a cheaper price, and with more Canadian content, by opening up tenders.

An open competition to select Canada's next-generation fighter would enable Canada's government and military to obtain access to detailed Super Hornet performance data, enabling a thorough and accurate evaluation of its advanced, proven capabilities, said Boeing spokeswoman Mary Brett in a statement.

Officially, Defence Minister Peter MacKay responded to the speculation in the House on Monday by promising that his government is set to invest in the next generation of fighters.

Stay tuned, Mr. MacKay said in response to NDP attacks against a sole-sourced contract.

Privately, government officials are saying Ottawa already made a decision in the 2008 Canada First defence policy to buy a next-generation fighter plane, and that Boeing lost the competition in the United States to build that aircraft in 2001.

Boeing has been driving the town crazy, said a senior government official directly involved in the project. This is a classic firestorm in Ottawa, with lobbyists stirring up the town trying to stall the acquisition of equipment for the Canadian Forces.

The Joint Strike Fighter is being developed by Lockheed-Martin, which won a competition to produce the next generation of stealth single-seat aircraft. Canada has invested $160-million so far in the development project, which will cost hundreds of billions of dollars. The U.S. Forces will buy about 2,400 of the F-35s.

The 65 new fighters that the Canadian government plans to buy will replace its current fleet of 80 CF-18s starting in 2017.

Competing aircraft manufacturers say that despite the federal investment, the Joint Strike Fighter might not be the way to go. The overarching theme among manufacturers is that they want to be able to participate in a competition, and that the government will get a better deal and more regional industrial benefits spread out across Canada if it opens up a tendering process.

Competition guarantees the best value for Canada, Boeing stated in a presentation to Conservative ministers last fall.

Boeing is insisting in its material that it will continue to produce its Super Hornet into the next decade, and that the U.S. Forces will continue to have more than twice as many of these planes than the Lockheed F-35s.

But Mr. MacKay signaled in the House of Commons on May 27 that his mind is made up. He initially spoke of the Joint Strike Fighter as the designated replacement for the CF-18s, before stating that a decision has yet to be made.

The Globe and the Mail
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Re: Fuerza Aérea de Canadá

Mensaje por Montero el Dom Abr 06, 2014 6:28 pm

Publicado por el forista Esteban McLaren el 29/03/2011 en [Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver este vínculo]

Canada fades from the skies.

March 28, 2011

When the Canadian government decided to send some warplanes to assist in establishing the no-fly zone over Libya, they found out that sending six of their CF-18 fighters would amount to 20 percent of flyable Canadian fighters. That was a bit shocking to most Canadians. But not to those who run the Canadian Air Force, as they know quite well that the CF-18 is on the way out. For example, late last year, Canada awarded $700 million in contracts to two commercial firms (Harris and L3) to provide maintenance for its F-18 fleet of jet fighters over the next nine years. This type of contract is increasingly popular, as they provide a cheaper way to provide all the more complex maintenance, other than what the ground crews do on a daily basis. This involves major overhauls, management of spare parts and upgrades of equipment. This includes the airframe, engines and electronics. Canada expects to retire its remaining 79 CF-18s by 2020, and replace them with 65 F-35s. Meanwhile, only about 30 CF-18s are flyable, because so many aircraft are undergoing upgrades and extended maintenance.

The CF-18s were purchased in the 1980s. Of the 128 originally received, 103 remain and 80 have been upgraded and remain in regular service. The 20 ton F-18 used by Canada (as the CF-18) was initially the F-18A model, but in the last decade, most have been upgraded to the F-18C standard. Canada plans to replace its CF-19s with the new 65 F-35s. The trend towards fewer, but more capable and expensive aircraft is a common one. Half a century ago, Canada had a fleet of nearly 600 fighters, including license built U.S. F-86s, and what would eventually amount to over 600 CF-100 fighters, the only Canadian designed fighter to enter mass production. The CF-100s were gradually retired over the next three decades. The last ones left service as the CF-18 entered service. But in between, Canada built, under license, several other U.S. fighter designs. Canada had become a major aircraft manufacturer during World War II (over 16,000 aircraft produced), and that provided the foundation for an aircraft industry that remains a major supplier of commercial aircraft to this day.

But Canadian military air power has steadily shrunk since World War II, when the Royal Canadian Air Force had over 2,000 aircraft, and over 210,000 personnel in service. By the time the "Royal" was dropped in 1968, Canada and the United States had pooled resources to build a North Atlantic air defense system. The U.S. provided most of the aircraft, and because the United States was more involved in overseas wars during the last half century (and had a much larger aircraft industry), built a larger air force. Lacking any local threats (unless you count the Russians, across the Arctic Ocean), Canadian air power has declined, relative to its population. Measured in that way (aircraft per million population), Canada has far fewer warplanes than most European nations. But given its lack of hostile neighbors, and an ally to the south that has the world's largest air forces, Canada is under no pressure to halt the decline in its air power.

Fuente: Strategy Page


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Re: Fuerza Aérea de Canadá

Mensaje por Montero el Dom Abr 06, 2014 6:32 pm

Publicado por el forista Esteban McLaren el 14/03/2012 en [Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver este vínculo]

Associate Defense Minister Fantino raises possibility of abandoning F-35 jet purchase.

Murray Brewster
Ottawa, The Canadian Press
Published Tuesday, Mar. 13, 2012

The point man on the F-35 stealth fighter purchase says the Conservative government has not ruled out abandoning the troubled project. We have not, as yet, discounted the possibility, of course, of backing out of any of the program, Associate Defence Minister Julian Fantino told a Commons committee Tuesday.

He made the comment after a series of pointed questions from both opposition parties.

Mr. Fantino said the government is still committed to buying the radar-evading jet, but no contract has been signed.

The Conservatives still believe the high-tech jet is the best choice to replace the aging CF-18s, but the minister suggested they are taking a cautious approach.

None of the other nine allied nations involved in the program has yet withdrawn and the minister said: We are not.

He insisted that the government will not leave the air force in the lurch as the current fleet of 1980s-vintage CF-18s reach the end of their projected service life around 2020. And we'll just have to think it through as time goes on.

His comments represent a further departure from the strident defence the Harper government has offered for the costly, long-delayed program.

Ever since declaring their intention to go with F-35, the Conservatives have doggedly defended the decision. They have dismissed calls for a reconsideration of the project and attacked critics who question the uncertain price tag.

The government tone began to change just before a meeting earlier this month in Washington where partner nations had a chance to quiz both the manufacturer and the Pentagon, which is co-ordinating international orders.

Outside the committee, Mr. Fantino denied the government is climbing down from its support for the jet.

I'm being realistic, he said. Until such time as the purchase is signed and ready to go, I think the only appropriate answer for me is to be forthright. We are committed to the program. We intend to do the best we can for our men and women and Canadian taxpayers with respect to replacing the CF-18.

In months of questioning in the House of Commons, Mr. Fantino has insisted there is no need for a backup plan in case of further delays in the project as the manufacturer works out software and design glitches.

But on Tuesday, he told the defence committee he was waiting for officials to prepare alternate scenarios to the F-35 deal, the so-called Plan B that opposition parties have demanded.

He described the request as what if research.

Dan Ross, the senior National Defence official in charge of procurement, testified that his staff and the air force have been continuously monitoring the international aircraft market, but downplayed the idea that there is a lot of choice available.

We don't see a change in what's out there, Mr. Ross said.

The Globe and the Mail

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